Jayshree Singh
5 min readNov 8, 2022

🌞🌷RASA — ADHAYA IN THE INTROSPECTIVE ECSTATIC RELATIONSHIP 💏🌞🌷

(with reference to the John Donne’s Poem “Good Morrow”- 1633 A. D. )

It means “good day’' or '’good morning.’' He talks about the two souls as though they have just woken up, greeting them and welcoming them to ...

A GOOD MORROW

When we are in stage of savouring the most beautiful Rasa of our aesthetic sensuality or when we are in our most ecstatic sensibility, that moment the sensitivities of pain and pleasure despite being a part of everyday life, yet get stuck up in the flow of profound amiable joyous stream and our delightful aesthetics transcendentalises our being which unearths itself from the layers of crust of hesitant covers, throws away the shroud covering our body, that anonymously embodies and overshadows the Soul. The moments in which mind undergoes various shades of emotions as delineated in Rasaadhya (rasa, (Sanskrit: “essence,” “taste,” or “flavour,” literally “sap” or “juice”) Indian concept of aesthetic flavour, an essential element of any work of visual, literary, or performing art that can only be suggested, not described), those moments when in introspective mode affect our relationship, our well being, our penchant for the other beings remains more or less passionate but incomplete. Rasa-adhaya is a feeling that derives out of live performance of the objects that is the agents of men in action. Such an innate drive to feel and to enact is a natural selection of harmony and to enjoy affinity to the being in whom one is totally immersed and let the other to be in complete immersion. John Donne in his poetry speaks of this ecstatic transmission and exchange of transmission of passion and purgation. The Good-Morrow
BY JOHN DONNE
I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I
Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?
But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?
Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?
’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.
If ever any beauty I did see,
Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.

And now good-morrow to our waking souls,
Which watch not one another out of fear;
For love, all love of other sights controls,
And makes one little room an everywhere.
Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,
Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,
Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.

My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,
And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;
Where can we find two better hemispheres,
Without sharp north, without declining west?
Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;
If our two loves be one, or, thou and I
Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.

x

It is also interesting to note how the stanzas are divided within the seven lines. The first four lines introduce something about the speaker’s love. While the next three reflect more deeply on the topic and sometimes provide an answer to a previously posed question.

The Good-Morrow by John Donne, 17th century British poet of Metaphysical Age describes the state of perfect love in which a speaker and his lover exist.
The Good-Morrow
Stanza One
I wonder, by my troth, what thou and I

Did, till we loved? Were we not weaned till then?

But sucked on country pleasures, childishly?

Or snorted we in the Seven Sleepers’ den?

’Twas so; but this, all pleasures fancies be.

If ever any beauty I did see,

Which I desired, and got, ’twas but a dream of thee.
In the first stanza of ‘The Good-Morrow’, the speaker begins with three questions. They all inquire into the state of his and his lover’s lives before they were known to one another. He wonders, addressing his lover, what “by my troth” (or what in the world) they did before they loved. This question and those which follow are rhetorical. He does not expect a real answer.

In the fourth line, he asks if they were sleeping like the “Seven Sleepers.” This is a reference to a story regarding seven children buried alive by a Roman emperor. Rather than dying, they slept through their long entombment to be found almost 200 years later. It is like the speaker has his lover were in stasis until they could be unearthed at the proper time and brought together.
The final three lines of the stanza answer his previous questions. He says, yes, of course, everything he said is the truth. Anything he experienced before getting with this current lover was not real. It was only a fancy.

Stanza Two
And now good-morrow to our waking souls,

Which watch not one another out of fear;

For love, all love of other sights controls,

And makes one little room an everywhere.

Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone,

Let maps to other, worlds on worlds have shown,

Let us possess one world, each hath one, and is one.

The second stanza is structured in a similar way in which the first four lines introduce a reader to another aspect of the relationship. He describes how now, in their “good-morrow’ they will live in happiness together. There will be no need to “watch…one anther out of fear.” Their relationship is perfect.

In the following lines, the speaker is proving that any temptation outside is worthless. His eyes are controlled by love, therefore everything he sees is transformed by his adoration. He speaks of a small room that contains everything on earth. .

Stanza Three
My face in thine eye, thine in mine appears,

And true plain hearts do in the faces rest;

Where can we find two better hemispheres,

Without sharp north, without declining west?

Whatever dies, was not mixed equally;

If our two loves be one, or, thou and I

Love so alike, that none do slacken, none can die.
The final stanza of ‘The Good-Morrow’ begins with the speaker looking into his lover’s eyes. There he can see his own face and he knows her face appears in his eyes as well. Their heartfelt connection is evident within their faces.

The next lines continue to refer to their bodies/ Donne makes use of conceit, one of the techniques for which he is the best know. In this case, he is comparing their faces to two hemispheres. Unlike the hemispheres of the actual world, their facial hemispheres are perfect. There are no “two better” in the universe. There is no “sharp north” or “declining west.” Donne’s speaker sees himself and his lover as soulmates, they are the other’s missing half.

The last three lines speak on how a lack of balance can cause death. This is likely a reference to the mediaeval science of humour in which one’s health was determined by an equal mix of blood, bile, etc. He uses this metaphor to make clear that their love is balanced physically and emotionally. Their perfect balance is accomplished due simply to the presence of the other. It is the combination of their emotions that keeps them together.

John Donne’s The Good Morrow is a characteristic metaphysical poem which deals with the theme of love a strong and true passion of love. After this souls walking up the lover and the beloved are consumed with the passion of love and they became one. In fact, oneness in love triumphs over all earthly mutability and morality and shines ever in mutual attachment a love which does not deal with the body but in the bond between the bond souls of the lovers.

Jayshree Singh

https://medium.com/@1967jayshreesingh A prolific creative writer as a researcher and critic so credited with Publications more